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Author West, C.E.; Renz, H.; Jenmalm, M.C.; Kozyrskyj, A.L.; Allen, K.J.; Vuillermin, P.; Prescott, S.L. url  doi
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  Title The gut microbiota and inflammatory noncommunicable diseases: associations and potentials for gut microbiota therapies Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2015 Publication The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Abbreviated Journal J Allergy Clin Immunol  
  Volume 135 Issue 1 Pages 3-13; quiz 14  
  Keywords Animals; Dietary Fiber/therapeutic use; Gastrointestinal Tract/*microbiology; Humans; Hypersensitivity/drug therapy; Inflammation/drug therapy/*etiology; *Microbiota; Prebiotics; Probiotics/therapeutic use; Fecal microbiota transplantation; gut microbiome; inflammation; noncommunicable diseases; prebiotics; probiotics; short-chain fatty acids  
  Abstract Rapid environmental transition and modern lifestyles are likely driving changes in the biodiversity of the human gut microbiota. With clear effects on physiologic, immunologic, and metabolic processes in human health, aberrations in the gut microbiome and intestinal homeostasis have the capacity for multisystem effects. Changes in microbial composition are implicated in the increasing propensity for a broad range of inflammatory diseases, such as allergic disease, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), obesity, and associated noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). There are also suggestive implications for neurodevelopment and mental health. These diverse multisystem influences have sparked interest in strategies that might favorably modulate the gut microbiota to reduce the risk of many NCDs. For example, specific prebiotics promote favorable intestinal colonization, and their fermented products have anti-inflammatory properties. Specific probiotics also have immunomodulatory and metabolic effects. However, when evaluated in clinical trials, the effects are variable, preliminary, or limited in magnitude. Fecal microbiota transplantation is another emerging therapy that regulates inflammation in experimental models. In human subjects it has been successfully used in cases of Clostridium difficile infection and IBD, although controlled trials are lacking for IBD. Here we discuss relationships between gut colonization and inflammatory NCDs and gut microbiota modulation strategies for their treatment and prevention.  
  Address International Inflammation (in-FLAME) Network of the World Universities Network; School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia  
  Corporate Author in-FLAME Microbiome Interest Group Thesis  
  Impact Factor 11,476 First Author West, C.E. Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Senior Author Prescott, S.L.  
  ISSN 0091-6749 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25567038 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 57  
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